Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 17th Global Neuroscience Conference Osaka, Japan.

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Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Wai Kwong Tang

Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, the Chinese University of Hong Kong

Keynote: Structural and functional MRI correlates of Poststroke Depression

Time : 10:00-10:45

Neuroscience 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Wai Kwong Tang photo
Biography:

Depression is common following an acute stroke. Poststroke Depression (PSD) have notable impacts on the function recovery and quality of life of stroke survivors. Incidence decreased across time after stroke, but prevalence of PSD tend to be stable. Many studies have explored the association between lesion location and the incidence of PSD. For example, lesions in frontal lobe, basal ganglia and deep white matter have been related with PSD. Furthermore, cerebral microbleeds and functional changes in brain networks have also been implicated in the development of PSD. In this presentation, evidences of such association between the above structural and functional brain changes and PSD will be reviewed.

Abstract:

Professor WK Tang was appointed to professor in the Department of Psychiatry, the Chinese University of Hong Kong in 2011. His main research areas are Addictions and Neuropsychiatry in Stroke. Professor Tang has published over 100 papers in renowned journals, and has also contributed to the peer review of 40 journals. He has secured over 20 major competitive research grants. He has served the editorial boards of five scientific journals. He was also a recipient of the Young Researcher Award in 2007, awarded by the Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Keynote Forum

Kah Leong Lim

National Neuroscience Institute, Singapore

Keynote: Neuroprotective and Neurorestorative Strategies for Parkinson’s disease

Time : 10:45-11:30

Neuroscience 2017 International Conference Keynote Speaker Kah Leong Lim photo
Biography:

Kah-Leong Lim obtained his Ph.D. from the Singapore Institute of Molecular & Cell Biology in 1999. Thereafter, he did his postdoctoral training at the Department of Pathology in Harvard Medical School (2000-2001), and subsequently at the Department of Neurology in Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (2001-2002), where he worked on the topic of Parkinson’s disease with Professor Ted Dawson. Dr. Lim is currently the Deputy Director of Research at the National Neuroscience Institute of Singapore and Director of Basic and Translational Research in the Singhealth Duke-NUS Neuroscience Academic Clinical Program. He is a member of the National Grant Review Panel (NMRC) and a regular reviewer of international grants including applications from the Welcome Trust and Medical Research Council (UK). Dr. Lim is an editor for PLoS One and Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience and a guest editor for PLoS Genetics. His research focuses on therapeutic development for Parkinson’s disease.

Abstract:

Parkinson disease (PD) is a prevalent neurodegenerative disease affecting millions of predominantly elderly individuals worldwide. Despite intensive efforts devoted to drug discovery, the disease remains incurable. Compounding this problem is the current lack of a truly representative mammalian model of PD. Interestingly; the Drosophila has emerged as a good system to model the salient features of the disease, including dopaminergic (DA) neurodegeneration and associated locomotion defects. Taking advantage of this and also the utility of the Drosophila as a tool for drug discovery, we have uncovered several neuroprotective compounds and associated targets. These include AMP Kinase (AMPK) activators that are relevant in human PD cases. Our results support the use of Drosophila PD model as an intermediate in vivo host for phenotype-based drug screening. Because PD involves the degeneration of neurons in a rather circumscribed region in the brain, neurorestorative therapy via cell replacement represents another strategy to treat the disease. Here, we have exploited the induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) technology to derive transgene integration- and feeder-free iPS from cells lining the human umbilical cord, an immunoprivileged organ that mediates interactions across the feto-maternal interface. Collectively designated as CLiPS (Cord Lining-derived iPS), we demonstrated that CLiPS-derived DA neuronal precursors transplanted into an immunocompetent 6-hydroxydopamine mouse model of PD not only survived but also differentiated into mature DA neurons in the absence of pharmacological immunosuppression. Further, the engrafted mice showed functional motor recovery and restoration of dopamine level (illuminated via PET imaging). These results position CLiPS as a promising source of donor cells for allogeneic cell replacement therapy for PD (Supported by NMRC-TCR).

  • Neurology | Spine and Spinal Disorders | Pediatric Neurology | Clinical Neurology | Dementia | Parkinsons | Neurosurgery | Diagnosis and Imaging Techniques | Pharmaceuticals and Therapies | Case reports
Speaker
Biography:

Arunkumar Prasad is the last year student in Taishan Medical University, China. He is the President of the Student Oragnisation in the field of Academics and other activities in TSMU. He was one of the speaker at the Euro Brain Injury 2017 held in London, UK. He is currently working as a young researcher and studying under his Professor Baoliang Sun (Neurologist, PhD, Dean of TSMU).

Abstract:

Recent studies suggest that CNS lymphatic drainage pathway to extracranial lymph compartments may play an important role in the removal of substances in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). After the onset of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), large amount of macromolecular substances, such as cellular lysates, proteins, peptides, were accumulated in the brain tissue and CSF, which contribute to cerebral vasospasm and cerebral injury. The present experiment was carried out to investigate the possible role of cerebral lymphatic drainage pathway in the development of cerebral vasospasm and related cerebral injury and the influence of Ginkgo biloba extract. Wistar rats were used in the experiment and animals were divided into different groups. SAH models were replicated by double cisternal injection of autologous arterial hemolysate. In some animals the main cerebral lymphatic drainage way out being blocked (cerebral lymphatic blockade, CLB). Two different constituents, Ginkgolides and Ginkgo flavone, were given as interventions. It was found that SAH reduced the drainage of Evans blue-labeled albumin (EBA) from the brain to the olfactory bulbs, cervical lymph nodes and abdominal paraaortic lymph nodes. A kinetic analysis of 125I-labeled human serum albumin (125I-HSA), a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tracer, showed that the clearance rate of macromolecules in the CSF was significantly reduced after SAH. Furthermore, SAH reduced the diameters of basilar artery (BA) and increased thickness of BA. Prominent cerebral injury was found after induction of SAH. The spasm of BA and cerebral injury were partially antagonized by Ginkgolides and Ginkgo flavone. It was concluded that cerebral lymphatic drainage pathway exerts intrinsic protective effects against cerebral vasospasm and cerebral injury by removal of macromolecular substances in the brain and subarachnoid spaces. Ginkgolides and Ginkgo flavone may alleviate the exacerbated cerebral vasospasm and cerebral injury following SAH by CLB.

Speaker
Biography:

Mr. Varun Vikas Vij has done M pharmacy in Pharmacology and pursuing PhD from Baba Farid University of Health Sciences Faridkot Punjab India and currently working as a Pharmacy Executive in Dayanand Medical College and Hospital Ludhiana Punjab India. Mr. Vij has 11 years of experience in pharmaceutical industry (9 years in Pharmaceutical marketing and 2 years in Hospital pharmacy). He has 2 International publications. He has keen interest in Neuro Pharmacology.  

Abstract:

Neuropathic pain (NP) is defined as pain associated with damage or permanent alteration of the peripheral or central nervous system. Current drug treatment for the management of neuropathic pain associated with various adverse effects. The present study was designed to investigate the combined effect of acamprosate and baclofen in experimental model of peripheral Neuropathic pain in wistar rats. Material and Methods: Neuropathic pain was induced by chronic constriction injured (cci) of sciatic nerve in rats. A camprosate (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o) and baclofen (10 and 20 mg/kg p.o) was given in different groups for 14 days starting on 7th day post sciatic nerve ligation. Further combination of acamprosate(100 mg/kg p.o) and baclofen (10 mg/kg p.o) was also given to one group. On 1th, 3rd, 7th, 14thand 21stday behavioral parameters like mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were assessed. Then animals were sacrificed on 22nd day and biochemical parameters (gsh, lpo, catalase, nitrite, sod) were assessed. Results: ligation of sciatic nerve significantly induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia with increase in oxidative stress (increase in lpo and nitrite) and decline of anti-oxidant enzyme levels (catalase, sod, gsh) in sciatic nerve homogenate. A camprosate (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o) and baclofen (10and 20 mg/kg p.o) attenuated all the behavioural and biochemical parameters alone and/or combination.

Nancy Brassard

ENA University

Title: Neuroscience
Speaker
Biography:

Nancy Brassard is a professor-researcher at the ENA University of Quebec teaching psychology, work, and mental health. Recently, completed superior studies in neuroscience to understand better the brain, its functions and those pathologies related like depression and FTD.  Scientist with a strong family history of FTD. 

Abstract:

At the beginning of Nancy Brassard mother’s disease, felt that I have to do something to help or to stop that! I began at this time to work intensively on what I am calling: The Quest! I asked my family members to participate with my mother and me at the study. I collected a lot of datas, made interviews and I built the whole family symptoms and history. This “Quest” led me to the Aging and memory center in May 2016, as a visiting scholar and to contribute slightly in the laboratory activities of Dr. Rankin. In last August, I had the honor of being invited by Dr. Bruce Miller to speak at the opening conference of Tau consortium in Denver. The title for my presentation was: Patient advocacy: A family story. At that time, I perceived the urgent need to help and support people dealing with a familial reality of FTD. This is unique!

I have initiated the past two years, studying in medicine and neuroscience, to better understand degenerative brain diseases especially, the stages, the onset of symptoms and the link with other variables such as, personality traits or lifestyle. I know that I can contribute to your event in many ways. First, I am teaching at the University since 12 years. I can contribute by my undeniable teaching skills, my openness and my strong ability to work in team. I have a strong research expertise and my scientific research skills are recognized by the scientific community. Second, being myself at risk of a brain disease, and as the President-founder of a non-profit Society, I am a great “Ambassador” to contribute with the researchers in the field in participating to their projects or to answer their questions, and share with them the importance of finding a cure for the families. I am hopeful, in a positive mind and I feel like if I have a mission. As a researcher, and especially as a daughter, and most of all, as a mother, I am in a Quest! Willing to participate or collaborate to find a cure or treatments and help people to deal with the disease and conciliate, understand and live with those realities. I want to be an example to show them that it is possible. I did it, I am doing it and I will continue to pursuit this Quest with passion, dedication and compassion.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Bangladesh is a small densely populated country facing problems of communicable and non-communicable diseases. By the enormous efforts of Government and non-Government agencies with the help of world health organization (WHO) communicable diseases have been kept under control or some of them are eradicated; however, at the same time there is emergence of no ncommunicable diseases (NCD) like diabetes mellitus, hypertension, is chaemic heart disease, cancer and stroke which are partly due to increase of expectancy of life as well as sedentary life style faulty food habit and others. All the important NCDs are prevalent in the country of which stroke demands spinal attention due to increase morbidity and mortality. Stroke is one of the commonest neurological diseases that affect a significant number of the population in Bangladesh. Furthermore, there are other neurological diseases like head injury, brain tumor, epilepsy, meningitis, encephalitis and many more. Therefore a large number of patients admitted everyday into the hospital for treatment purposes. However, due to limited facilities of intensive care unit (ICU), hospital bed, and interventional neurology in the hospital these cause a great burden to the health sector of Bangladesh. In addition to that lack of advance technologies cause delayed diagnosis leading to influence the patients to go to abroad for better treatment. Therefore huge amount of foreign currencies are drained every year. Keeping all these things in mind the member of the society of Neurosciences have decided to establish National Institute of Neurosciences (NINS) in Bangladesh with the vision of making this Institute as the centre of excellence not only in this country but also for others. Ultimately the present NINS is the outcome of this effort. Currently this is the only referral tertiary care Neurology hospital in Bangladesh dealing with neurological as well as neurosurgical diseases. The current objective of NINS is to provide treatment to different neurological and neurosurgical cases in this country and to do the scientific research works as well as to collaborate with the other parallel institutes in abroad. It is a matter of pride that the institute has started functioning from September 2012 with OPD, IPD, emergency, ICU services as well as well equipped operation theater (OT) facilities. There are more than 15 departments related to neurological and neurosurgical diseases with more than 150 faculty members. Neurophysiology and interventional neurology are the two newly established departments which have been established first time ever in Bangladesh at public health sector. The NINS should be the centre of excellence in the country in near future where there should be the provision for one step services for the neurological cases. By this time the Institute has got its working life with the presence of 800 to 1000 patients in OPD everyday and 8 to 10 minor to major operation and the work in the Para clinical departments.